Monday, October 10, 2011

Wizard Robe

 Halloween is approaching fast, and it's my favorite holiday.  Last year,  due to a recent move and being sick, I didn't participate.  This year I'm trying to make up for it.  Alec is going to be Dumbledore,  because it's the last year he will have his epic beard.  I'm going to go as Hermione,  so we compliment each other.  I'm going to go as polyjuice mix up  cat Hermione so it's extra fun.

When Alec and I went to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter last January,  they had all the house robes,  but they were over-priced and cheaply made.  Instead I picked up an official Hogwarts crest patch so I could make my own custom robe.

I created the robe pattern by expanding a tent sloper to full length and adding bishop style sleeves and a hood. This is not a replica of the movie robes by any means.  I didn't fully line this robe,  it just has facing pieces to finish the opening.  It is a generic Hogwarts robe, as it doesn't have any of the house colors for the lining. This way it can be any character's robe.

 To make it, I was trying to use material I already had around the house.  I didn't have the right kind of buttons in black, so I just found the right size in my button collection and covered them in the same fabric as the robe.  I used a lightweight woven cotton that I had found at a fabric re-use place in Portland.  I would recommend a heavier weight synthetic that resists wrinkling if I was going to make it again.  There are in seam pockets on the sides for wands and chocolate frogs.




If you would like to make a robe similar to the one I made,  here is the rough pattern.  Print this out and blow it up until it is the size of the measurements stated.  This is a very roomy robe that could fit a large range of sizes.
*Addition April 18, 2013*
Here are the really rough instructions on how to put the pattern pieces together. If you've never sewn before this isn't enough information for you to put the robe together correctly, it's just a loose guide for people who've sewn from patterns before.

click images to view larger

55 comments:

  1. Hi Claire, Have been browsing the internet recently in order to find out how to make a wizards robe and your design is so far the best one i have come accross so far. I had the right look that i want and it comes in pieces that can be cut out of regular fabric rolls. Unfortunately I am a complete novice when it comes to fabric crafts and cant figure out how the bits labled facings fit into the design. Would appreciate an email to bembleman@gmail.com clairfying this.

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  2. This looks very interesting. I'm going to try it out and make one for a 1/6 action figure.

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  3. how many yards did you use over all?

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    1. I picked up a black flat sheet (queen) at Goodwill and it was the perfect amount. Plus, the hems were already done!

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  4. I think about 5-6 yards, but I was just using some extra fabric I had around. If you're buying fabric I would add an extra yard or so on top of that just to be safe.

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  5. for not being based off the movie, they look just like they came off the movie set. great pattern

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  6. Do you think this would pull over the head, if the front was also sewn shut? I need a closed robe with lined hood.

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  7. I think so, the robe is pretty roomy in general. But once you figure out the pattern that would fit you, measure the neck opening to make sure you can get your head through.

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  8. This pattern is awesome! Thank you so much for sharing it.
    I have been sewing small projects (like all different kinds of pouches and purses...) for the last years but I never dared to make anything bigger like clothing. But now I needed a robe for my Hermione costume and your description helped me perfectly. Thanks so much.

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  9. hello:) This pattern is really cool! if i want to print this pattern out, what size of paper do i need for?

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  10. I'm not sure, but you would have to tile it for it to fit a regular person as pattern paper is usually very large. I didn't work out the exact pattern so that you can just push print, this is a very loose guide. I would recommend buying a complete existing robe sewing pattern if you want to make sure it will fit you correctly.

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  11. How much fabric would you recommend for the facing and hood lining?

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    1. I would say about a yard and a half, mostly because some of the pieces are long and curved.

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  12. Thank you so much for posting the pattern and the how-to instructions. I'm below novice standards with sewing and I feel that I will actually able to make this. How do I go about printing something like this? I tried to have a local printing store assist me and was given a $25 quote! I have brought a pattern into the store to be blown up before and it was no where near that cost. Any suggestions?? Thanks!

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    1. I still recommend buying a commercial sewing pattern because it comes with step by step instructions on how to sew it all together and they're typically under $20. My post is very rough and is more a guide if you already know how to make patterns.

      But you can enlarge the image the the old fashioned way by printing out the pattern image on a sheet of 8.5x11 paper and laying a grid over it. Then get some big butcher block paper and lay a corresponding grid that is enlarged to the size you want. There is a detailed explanation of the process here: http://www.art-is-fun.com/grid-method.html

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  13. This looks really helpful

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  14. Hi! I just made two robes following your pattern and they turned out great! :)
    I was just wondering, how did you fasten the lining inside the hood/neckhole and along the front? I ended up doing it by hand using invisible stitches, which took a long time and was a bit awkward. Do you have a method that works better?

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  15. I sewed it by machine, put the right side of the facing to the right side of the front of the robe and the hoods. The seam should be easy to get under the machine, then you would fold the facing in, leaving a clean edge and no visible seams in the hood.

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    1. I meant AFTER you've done that, with the other edge of the facing? Didn't you fasten that inside the cloak somehow?

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    2. I still used a machine, you can see the stitch line on the outside of the robe, but since mine is black thread on black fabric it's hard to notice. It's partially hidden by the hood folding over the robe a little too, it runs into personal preference at this point on how much you want to hide the stitches.

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  16. claire - about how tall are you? does this robe reach the ground for you? id like to make it but need to scale it up for my height (5'10") and just wanted to check your height to be able to change the measurements. my email is kristen.ewer@gmail.com if you have the time - need to make it this week for a costume party saturday! thanks!

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    1. I'm 5'6" and it reaches to the floor on me. There is some hem to work with but you will probably want to add some length there and in the sleeves too.

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    2. thanks so much for your reply!

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  17. Wow -- this is awesome! Thanks for doing this!

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  18. My cousin wants to make this for her son, who is now six feet tall. She would like to know if it is hard to scale up.

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    1. It shouldn't be too hard to scale up. Start with the son's measurement from his neck to the floor, then see how much would be added in the length to get the right size. It's already pretty roomy, but she may need to add some width too.

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  19. Thank you so much. I've been searching for a costume and decided i wanted to do a Hogwarts professor...but the picture at the top made me change my mind...definitely going with Hermione's polly juice potion mishap. :D

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  20. Love this! I've been looking at the pattern/cuts image on google image search for weeks. Today I'm going to the Design District in Miami to actually get the fabric and make this happen. Thanks so much for providing such great drawings and instructions. I've worked a sewing machine before but this for sure be my biggest project to date. Feeling confident! Thanks again for such a great post on Hogwarts robes

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  21. Hi, Claire! Thanks for posting this. You have great vertical measurements, but I'm wondering if you noted anywhere the widths? Like, how wide at the bottom and chest for the robe body panels?

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    1. If you blow up the pattern to meet the vertical dimensions, the width will scale along with it.

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  22. Hello Ms Sanders! I have a question for you. How many yards of fabric did you use for this? I'm interesting in helping to make a couple of these robes, one for Gryffindor and one for Slytherin and I need to know the yardage so I can purchase the right amount of fabric. :) Other than that, I love them! I showed this to a friend and suggested that we make robes and wear them around school. :)

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    1. Since I made it 4 years ago I don't have the yardage. Once you create the pattern pieces then you can lay them flat and measure how much space they take up to determine the fabric yardage. It's also hard to tell because it will also be determined by the width of the fabric you choose.

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    2. OK. Thanks. :3 For the pattern, you just print it out? (I'm a bit new to this)

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    3. The pattern provided is really rough, if you're new to this I recommend buying a commercial pattern with actually step by step instructions, yardage and fabric suggestions. But if you check the previous comments there are some recommendations for taking the rough pattern image and blowing it up to be the actual size.

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  23. Once I'd laboriously enlarged this pattern to 80% of your suggested measurements, everything worked like a charm. I used 2.5m of black fabric and 1.5m of royal blue lining for my petite 15-yr-old granddaughter's Ravenclaw robe. I'm awaiting the arrival via Fedex of the Ravenclaw crest. What a perfect Christmas gift along with an electronic wand for controlling her devices :) :) Thank you for sharing your pattern and sewing instructions

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  24. Thank you so much for posting this pattern. I am making a Ravenclaw robe for myself and a Hufflepuff robe for my husband. I do have one question, though...I was able to get everything to work, except for attaching the sleeves! I had a terrible time doing that--they kept getting caught and creating needless pleats and look awkward. I will admit that I have never sewn using a "real" pattern - I just like to make patterns myself and it usually works out ok. But I have a terrible time with the sleeves! Do you have any recommendations? Even pinning them was awkward.

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    1. It's a little more time consuming but you can loosely hand stitch (baste) the sleeve to the body of the robe, before you machine stitch it. This can help work out any gathers or tucks that you don't want.

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  25. I've been looking for a way to get a nice Hogwarts robe for not that expensive, but I have neither the equipment or skill necessary to be able to do this... Is there a way that maybe you could make one for me, using my measurements and I pay you for it?

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    1. Unfortunately I don't have the time to make a robe for you. You could try local craigslist to see if a seamstress in your area would be interested in making a robe, but most custom clothing is expensive because it takes time and skill.

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  26. Thank you for share, you save my life with this.

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  27. wow, really impressed by the hood pattern and the professional layout/tutorial. Hope to make this very soon

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  28. Not a seamstress by any means, but this pattern worked well for a 6" inch Dumbledore that I am making for making for my miniature Hogwarts castle. Did not dare try to use the machine, but hand stitching such a small garment took very little time. I made the robe from purple silk and then made an over-tunic out of a tiny co-coordinating purple cotton print. Have not yet added the hood because Dumbledore wears a hat, but now that I have actually finished one robe, I am thinking I could make a few more characters for the castle, with hoods this time. Thanks so much for taking the time to post this.

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  29. When my niece stated that she was going to have a Harry Potter Birthday party for her 11th (naturally) I HAD to dress up and I have to say your design is the BOMB. I'm not exactly a beginner but I'm no pro. It was really easy to follow! I have no way to blow the pattern up so I just hand drew them by looking at the pics. My Ravenclaw robes look FANTASTIC!! Thank you so much!!

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    1. Hi Lydia, how many yards of each fabric did you use?

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  30. Your pattern and instructions look great.
    I have cut the pattern out and have a question about attaching the sleeves.
    The edge of the sleeve is longer than the corresponding opening edge on the body. How does that fit together?
    I was about to cut the arm hole bigger but decided there must be a reason.

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    1. The sleeve has some ease built into the cap so it flows over the top of the shoulder. You might want to run some loose shirring stitches as the top and gather those to fit the armhole correctly. But since this is a very casual pattern there may be some error in the pattern too. If it seems like it makes more sense to widen the armhole, the robe is loose so there is wiggle room in fitting the pieces.

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  31. Hi Claire! Thanks for this great pattern! Can you tell me about seams allowance? How long? Have a nice day!

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  32. I think I left about 1/2 in. seam allowance but it's a loose robe so if you need more just add a little more around the edge. I'm 5'6" and it hits the floor for me with about a 3 inch hem, whatever length that is, but it's easy to let it out or take it in for the length you need.

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  33. Thank you for posting this. I have just made my son one. He will be so happy when he wakes up in the morning.

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  34. I am a teacher so I can take the pattern pieces and blow them up on my smart board to the correct measurements and trace each piece with poster paper. My neice has asked for one with blue lining for her birthday in may.

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  35. Excellent patterns, my son is very happy! Although I opted to leave out the "facing" details and instead used the "normal" patterns to make two robes - one red and one black, that I then sewed together with the red as lining in the black one. (Turns out that it wasn't intuitive how to sew the arms together inside out so that they will work as they should when turned right - had to remove all the stitches multiple times until I got it right.)

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